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12 Insider Hacks For A Best-Selling Crochet Design

Crochet Designer Tips for Beginners

12 TIPS Crochet Design | CrochetBusiness.com/blog | @momwithahook #pattern #crochet #design

12 TIPS Crochet Design | CrochetBusiness.com/blog | @momwithahook #pattern #crochet #design

Crochet pattern design is not difficult. You simply crochet a piece of fabric into something that is wearable or artistic.

Writing a pattern on the other hand is.

It takes skill to turn a design into a written pattern that is easy to understand for a wide audience.

How Can You Write Your Own Crochet Patterns?

I asked a number of crochet pattern designers what hacks they have for those getting started – Here’s what they shared: (plus a few from crochet blogs I follow)

1. Organization

This tip comes from Amanda Nicole Anderson of MNE Crafts.

Organization!! It really helps to be organized and have a game plan on what you’re going to design, when you’re going to have it tested, by how many testers, when you’re going to do photos and when you’re planning on releasing.

2. Finished Edges

When crocheting an edge for a hat or a blanket – crochet one row/round of sc stitches in the same color yarn – before changing colors for the decorative edge – this will give your project a more finished/professional look ~ Rhondda of oombawkadesigncrochet

 3. Use a Tech Editor

Stop Using ‘Scrap’ and ‘Small Amount’ – although I know what I’m talking about when I say this, someone who works my pattern may not. Did I mean 1 yard or 5 yards? Although it takes a little more time, it is worth it. ~ (Me via a Guest Post on Moogly Blog – 5 Things I Learned Using A Tech Editor)

4. Swatch and Measure

… it’s time to swatch and gauge. I have to admit this isn’t something I’ve always done. I used to just ‘wing it’ and got lucky quite a bit. But now that I’m designing more clothing items and selling the patterns, I do the swatch and gauge because it makes things easier for me and for those who purchase the crochet pattern to know they are on the right track. – See more at: Sedruola Maruska of YarnObsession

 5. Use a Style Sheet

Use the style sheet information to turn your rough, note-taking template into a formal pattern template that you will use to create the actual pattern. Patrice Walker of Yarn Over Pull Through – The Heart and Soul of Crochet 

6. Inspiration Can Come From Anywhere

For me, crochet inspiration usually falls into one of three categories: from a crochet stitch, from a non-crochet item, or from necessity. Do you ever see a beautiful or interesting stitch that you just can’t wait to try out? Making your own pattern is the perfect opportunity to do so! Heidi Speckless via WhipUp

 7. Write Down Everything

The most important thing to do when you are writing a pattern for a crocheted item you are designing is- Write down everything you do at the time you are actually making the item. Bella Crochet 

 8. You Are Already a Designer

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. I feel like most crocheters are indeed designers, even if it’s just a tweak of a pattern and even if you have no intention of writing the pattern. Kim Guzman

9. Math is Your Friend

Calculate how many chains you start with along with yarn and hook you are using. Cat’s Rockin’ Crochet  (template for designing a one-piece dress, jumper, sweater)

10. Use A Format and Common Stitch Template (stylesheet)

Having a template with your format as well as common stitches, etc. this allows you to quickly customize for the current pattern and add specific instructions. Maria Bittner of Pattern Paradise

11. Be Available to Your Pattern Testers

It goes without saying that you’ll need to be available to your testers during a pattern test. In addition, these 8 tips will help you to organize (and enjoy! and get a lot out of!) your first pattern test. Marie Segares of The Underground Crafter and Hostess of Creative Yarn Entrepreneur 

 12. Add Links and Coordinating Items

From a business perspective, I think it’s great to include links at the end to other patterns the person might enjoy if they liked making this one (like coordinating items, something at a similar ability level, etc.) I also include thumbnails of my most popular patterns and a link to a buy 2 or buy 4 patterns discount deal at the end. Jenny Nicholas Thomas of Acorn Tree Creations

Do you design crochet patterns? What tips do you have for those just starting out? Leave a comment below or join us in the Create Crochet Patterns Facebook group or Fanpage.

About I Love Crochet

Sara Duggan is a Wife and Mom enjoys crocheting and writing. She joined the crochet blogging community in 2007 as Momwithahook. In 2008 she toyed with designing patterns and shares her creations with you. Connect with Sara on Twitter and Pinterest.

  • My daughter loves to crochet and is always asking for my help, now i can actually help! great post thanks for sharing xox
    http://www.laurajanestyle.blogspot.co.uk

    • Laura Jane,
      I’m glad your daughter enjoys crocheting. A great blog for her to check out is Mooglyblog.com. She has great patterns and fantastic video tutorials.

  • My daughter wants to learn to crochet, so I am forwarding this post to her. So much great information in just one spot!

    • Elayna, thanks for stopping by today. I hope your daughter enjoys learning how to crochet. Have her check out Mooglyblog.com for great video tutorials on the beginning stitches.

  • Awesome advice! My sister loves to crochet, I’m going to send her this link today. Thanks for sharing!

    • Misty, oh I hope she can use their advice. Lots of great designers to learn from.

  • I personally don’t know how to crochet but I love how it looks!

    • Salma, it’s not that hard and yes, some designs are really lovely.

  • There’s always more to creation than meets the eye! Thanks for the wonderful tips.

    • Tamsin, yes there is. It’s the same for most things. We don’t really know all that goes into something – the ‘behind the scenes’ work to make something run smoothly and look good.