15 Crochet Patterns with Permission to Sell Finished Product

15 patterns crochet

Why Yes You Can Sell Crochet Items

As a crochet business owner you need a ready supply of crochet patterns that you can use to make products. Many of the big brand yarn sites will give you permission to use their free patterns. Many Independent designers will give you permission too. As part of the first edition of Hooking for Cash I included a list of 50+ Etsy shops and Websites that offer patterns you can use.

crochet scarf finished

image: gleangenie via morguefile.com

Permission to Sell Finished Product: What Does This Mean?

It means that you have the right to use the pattern to make the product. You also have permission to sell the product that you make. You however, DO NOT have permission to sell the pattern or claim the design as your own. Pretty simple huh?

Most designers do suggest that you give them credit by listing their shop or website on the hang tag so others can buy the pattern and make one. Sounds good huh?

  1. Lion Brand – You can use all of Lion Brand patterns however if a design is from a copyrighted book you must ask the author of the book. 
  2. CrochetSpot – Rachel gives you permission to sell finished pieces as long as you link back to her site {crochetspot.com Rachel Choi Designer}
  3. Donna’s Crochet Designs – Permission is granted just add a link back to her site. {donnascrochetdesigns.com}
  4. Planet June – All items must be made by you and not manufactured by a company. You must also note that she is the designer of the pattern. {planetjune.com}
  5. Hyena Cart – Search under cottage license and you can by a limited or life-time license to produce products like longies and shorties. {WiggleBunzCreations and FamilyPendragon}
  6. Crochet n Crafts – all of her patterns can be used with a link back to her site. {crochetncrafts.com}
  7. YarnLover TN on Etsy – Be sure to read the listing as not all patterns qualify. If you do use a pattern you need to link back to her shop. {yarnlovertn.etsy.com}
  8. Bonita Patterns – Credit the design to Bonita Patterns along with a link back to her shop. {bonitapatterns.etsy.com}
  9. The Happy Crocheter – Credit needs to be given to Ann Parri Design with her website. If you sell the finished item on Etsy you must include the following “This crochet item was designed by Ann Parri – thehappycrocheter.etsy.com“.
  10. McPatterns – Link to her shop {mcpatterns.etsy.com}
  11. Sea Horse Designs – Link to her shop {seahorsedesigns.etsy.com}
  12. Patterns by Parker – You must include a link to her etsy shop in your listing. {patternsbyparker.etsy.com}
  13. Yarn Blossom Boutique - Must mention “Yarn Blossom Boutique” and website in listing {yarnblossomboutique.etsy.com}
  14. Brooke’s Little Stitch – Include the following in your listing “Made with a pattern created by Brooke’s Little Stitches. Pattern found at brookeslittlestitch.etsy.com“.
  15. Living in Amethyst - Mention her shop livingamethyst.etsy.com in your listing and on your hang tag.

Don’t forget to add your blog post to the CBB July 2013 linky. (scroll down to the bottom of the post)

SELL MORE CROCHET

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About Sara Duggan

Sara Duggan is a Wife and Mom who enjoys crocheting and writing. She joined the crochet blogging community in 2007 as Momwithahook. In 2008 she toyed with designing patterns and shares her creations on Squidoo. Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Comments

  1. I actually contacted one of the large publishing companies to confirm the use of their patterns – I had purchased a stitch dictionary book – outlining numerous crochet stitches for cables. They indicated that anything I made using the stitches was mine to sell and anything I designed using the stitches was my design to sell. It was good to know – when there is so much confusion on copyright floating around – it certainly gives me more confidence as a Designer. Rhondda
    Rhondda Mol recently wrote…5 Things Every ( Crochet ) Blogger Needs to Know AboutMy Profile

  2. This is a fab list of places to find patterns that you can sell the finished items from. I’d like to add One and Two Company on Etsy. They make great applique patterns and I love how clear their instructions are.
    Petra recently wrote…Blog Challenged?My Profile

  3. Oh, I have one and Two Company on the original list of 50 which is in the eBook. I too love their appliques. So much crochet talent I need more time.

  4. Most definitely. Asking is just the simplest way to erase any doubt. Ask the publisher, ask the designer, or look it up yourself on the copyright site. I can’t even begin to tell you how many people (me included) who were bound up under this misconception. It really sets everyone free to just be creative.

    Yes, there are real cases where copyright is violated but I’m not referring to those cases. Designers earn their money from designing and publishing patterns so YES it hurts them when people share BUT it’s not infringement unless you sell it or mass produce it. (Okay I might have just stuck my foot in my mouth there)

    p.s. When I say share, I’m referring to someone who owns a copy of a book who brings the book to a crochet club. Everyone looks at the pattern in the book to make the same thing. This is using instructions to make something that YOU own NOT copyright infringement. People will disagree with me and insist that everyone buy the book but that is more of a “support the artist” moral which is perfectly fine but is not an infringement.

  5. Thanks for these additions to the original list of 50, Sara. Always good to know who these generous indie designers are! I have some free patterns on my blog. You can add me to your next list if you like.

  6. Patrice,
    Oh, that is great. I will add it to the ever growing list that will be included in the eBook coming out August 2013.

  7. I would love to add Snappy Tots to the list of patterns that can be made and sold. Thanks for the opportunity.

  8. Heidi, that is fabulous. Not sure if you remember me but I participated in your hats for Connecticut campaign. I recognized your name immediately.